Scuba Diving vs Snorkeling & Understanding the Differences

The common denominator between scuba diving and snorkeling is fascinating underwater exploration. What differs between these two aquatic activities is the level of exploration available. The question is not, which sport is better, but rather which sport do you prefer? Each one of these aquatic activities calls for both a mask, fins, and some sort of breathing device to allow participants to obtain an uninterrupted view of our underwater world. The sport you choose is all up to you. Read below for a description of each underwater activity to help determine your preference.

Snorkeling

Snorkeling

Snorkeling is a great aquatic activity for those of all ages as all it requires is the ability to breathe and swim. Plus, no prior training or certification is needed! All one needs to do is place the mouthpiece of the snorkel into their mouth, adjust the facemask for optimal fit, and slip a pair of fins on the feet to begin. The mouthpiece aids in breathing, the facemask allows a clear underwater view and the fins give your legs maximum power to move through the ocean effortlessly. Novice snorkelers should start in areas with clam and clear water only taking a few short kick cycles to bring the underwater world into view. One little known fact is that snorkelers often see things that divers miss, like turtles because they breathe air and have to frequently visit the surface. Luckily, snorkelers are always near the surface and will not miss the many wondrous sea creatures that must ascend for air from time to time. Divers spend the majority of their time around the bottom of the ocean, always looking down.

Diving

Diving

However, if you are looking to be total totally immersed within the ocean’s body, than scuba diving may be the underwater activity for you. When scuba diving you are suspended in 360 degrees of pure aquatic freedom. You will be able to go deeper down than snorkelers as you are equipped with a tank of highly compressed air strapped to your back and a couple of other goodies as well. Generally, a divers equipment consists of a mask, snorkel, fins, wetsuit, regulator, depth gauge, buoyancy control device, air gauge, and mouthpiece. Keep in mind that if you desire to dive that it will require training and a certification. As a diver you will be able to access great depths of the unknown with your specific knowledge and air supply. An open water course can take you up to four days of class hours to complete. Once you receive your open water certification you will be to able to dive up to 70% of our big blue planet.

Whether you choose snorkeling or scuba diving, it matters not, as both offer amazing opportunities for adventure and exploration!